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Upcoming "On-Demand" Classes

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Course Title: Cerebrovascular disease – vessel anatomy, irrigation areas & related agnosias, apraxic and aphasic syndromes.

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Five (5) Classroom Hours

    Class Description: All doctors of chiropractic should be familiar with the topic of cerebral vascular accidents (stroke). This class focuses on the cerebral anatomy and vascular anatomy and hemodynamics of the brain and brain stem and with the associated stroke syndromes. The class begins with a detailed discussion of the surface topography of the cortex (Dr. J. Donald Dishman), and the arteries that irrigate the cortex, as well as the venous drainage of the brain and spinal cord. This discussion is clinically oriented and details anatomical areas associated with stroke syndromes. The class then includes a review of the signs and symptoms of cortical disease associated with cerebrovascular syndromes, as well as a thorough discussion of the various cerebral vascular syndromes.

    Class Objectives:

    Outline topography and discuss internal anatomy of the cortex.

    Illustrate and list functions of the various lobes of the brain.

    Identify and describe anterior and posterior intracranial circulatory patterns.

    Relate cortical anatomy with electrode placement when eliciting somatosensory evoked potentials.

    Identify irrigation distribution of all major intracranial arteries.

    Diagram irrigation to the levels of the spinal cord.

    Describe intracranial venous drainage of the skull and differentiate between dural sinuses, bony sinuses and cerebral veins.

    List areas of the cortex responsible for vision, hearing and touch and explain their interaction with the association cortex.

    Give examples traits and characteristics associated with hemisphere dominance.

    Define and differentiate the agnosias, such as apraxia, aphagia, etc.

    Define constructional apraxia, and discuss the clinical significance.

    Quantify the incidence of various types of neurovascular disease.

    Contrast and compare strokes from a vascular anatomical and etiology viewpoint.

    List and discuss choices for various forms of imaging based upon suspected stroke etiology.

    Identify treatable, untreatable and possible risks for cerebrovascular accident.

    Identify medical and conservative options for treatment of cerebrovascular accident risk factors.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for IA. 

    Course Title: Iowa Chiropractic Code

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: One (1) Classroom Hours

    Class Description: All Iowa Doctors of Chiropractic are requited to have at least one CEU of Iowa Chiropractic Code review.  This clear and focused class is designed to comply with that requirement.  

    Class Objectives:

    Outline news from the Iowa Board of Chiropractic.

    Review Iowa Chiropractic Code (151) and focus on important areas for Iowa practicing chiropractic to review.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Course Title: Ethics for Chiropractors

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Two (2) Classroom Hours

    Class Description: All Iowa Doctors of Chiropractic are requited to have at least two (2) CEU of Professional Boundaries or Ethics training for each chiropractic license renewal biennium. This clear and focused class is designed to comply with that requirement by focusing on ethical issues and behavior.  

    Class Objectives:

    Review items included in the State of Iowa and American Chiropractic Association "Principles of Chiropractic Ethics".

    Define and distinguish between principles of philosophy, ethics and morality. 

    Explore the concept of "The Greater Good".

    Differentiate general concepts of what is right and wrong, from personal decisions of what is right and wrong.

    Define the term "Fiduciary Responsibility".

    Give examples of "Ethical Dilemmas" that might face a doctor of chiropractic and provide discussion of alternative thoughts.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Course Title:  Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy (CSMT) and Vertebrobasilar Ischemia (VBI)

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Eight (8) Classroom Hours

    Class Description:

    The chiropractic neurologist is uniquely qualified to be the world's foremost authority on the complex issue of cervical adjustments and any relation to cerebrovascular accidents (CVA). This class is designed to thoroughly discuss the issue of Cervical Spinal Manipulative Therapy (CSMT) and subsequent Vertebrobasilar Ischemia (VBI).  

    Class Objectives:

    Outline methods used and estimations as to the incidence of cervical spinal manipulative therapy and subsequent vertebrobasilar ischemia.

    Review and describe cerebrovascular anatomy and hemodynamics.

    Discuss proposed patho-physiological mechanisms believed responsible for subsequent vertebrobasilar ischemia.

    Review and discuss past and present scientific literature to explore the evolution of what we think we know about the process of cervical spinal manipulative therapy and subsequent vertebrobasilar ischemia.

    Identify radiographic signs of a vertebral artery dissection.

    List and discuss the uses, pros and cons of current examination tools as they apply to vertebral artery dissection.

    Explore issues and examination procedures related to patient assessment as well as vertebrobasilar ischemia recognition and proper diagnosis.

    Define and contrast currently suggested procedures and develop a vertebrobasilar ischemia plan of action.

    Explore various perspectives and reveal bias in both public media and biomedical journals.

    Identify and define new theoretical concepts and prophylactic therapies.

    Give multiple examples of anti-chiropractic bias in the biomedical literature

    List and describe the most common red flags for a patient “at risk” for suffering Vertebrobasilar Ischemia following cervical manipulation.

    Recite list of scientific studies relating to laboratory testing of plasma Homocystine levels and its relationship to Vertebrobasilar Ischemia from vertebral artery dissection.

    List examples of bias against chiropractic cited in both the popular media as well as in biomedical journals.

    Critically review landmark articles regarding the issue of cervical manipulation and vertebrobasilar distribution ischemia.

    List studies suggesting that a high plasma homocystine level may be associated with vertebrobasilar dissection.

    Cite studies suggesting that increasing folic acid intake can reduce plasma Homocystine levels.

    Identify laboratory tests that may be useful in helping calculate an individual’s risk of suffering vertebrobasilar stroke following cervical manipulation.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board. 

    This program consists of two clinical cases, as well as a video lecture on history and mental status assessment.

    NOTE: THE SAME CLASS (301) IS BUNDLED INTO THE 5 CEU "CHIROCLASSES ON-DEMAND 301-2-3" ALONG WITH CASES 302 & 303 (314e1). CLASS #301 & 303 (314e1) ARE ALSO OFFERED INDEPENDENTLY ON THE WEBSITE, SO BE CAREFUL NOT TO ACCIDENTALLY REPEAT THE CLASS . 

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    Course Title: 301: Cases in neurology: Numbness and weakness in a 50 year old male.

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Five (5) Classroom Hours

    Format: Audio/Video Case Presentation

    Class Description:

    This class includes a complete discussion of a videotaped patient case.  The patient was brought by her treating chiropractor to the neurology diplomate program classroom in Des Moines Iowa in September of  2000.  He was a 5o year old male complaining of multiple areas of numbness, paresthesia and dysesthesia in his hands and feet, as well as across his abdomen and on his lateral lower extremity.  This class includes a review of the medical records prior to meeting the patient, the complete examination with discussion, and a report and discussion following the examination.

    Class Objectives:

    List the differential diagnoses that may accompany various symptoms. 

    Describe various essential elements of the history taking process.

    List differential diagnoses for this and similar cases.

    Itemize and describe several tests of lower extremity motor and reflex function.

    Recognize a true extensor toe sign from an equivocal or false finding.

    Contrast and compare aspects of various disorders causing cervical spine myelopathy.  

    Use proper language and nomenclature when producing a report for referring physicians.

    Recognize aspects of spinal cord disease.

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    Course Title: 302 Grand Rounds – Case v104

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    Format: Audio/Video Case Presentation

    Class Description:

    This class is designed to reveal actual doctor patient interaction during an initial diagnostic consultation.   The class also includes a grand rounds type case presentation.

    Focus is on the critical thinking process including questions asked during the history and the selection of tests used during the examination as well as to observe and develop better psychomotor skills regarding examination performance.  Specific diagnostic impressions and associated chiropractic management are explored as well.

    Class Objectives:

    Observe a doctor patient encounter where the patient is a young female with a primary complaint of tremor.

    Explore the history taking process in an actual clinical setting.

    Observe patient examination techniques.

    Summarize relevant clinical findings.

    Illustrate the clinical presentations of various complaints and the approach to diagnosis.

    Organize findings during the examination and explore for relevancy as applied to diagnosis of the presenting complaint.

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    Course Title: 303 History & Mental Status Review

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    Format: Video of Live Class

    Class Description:

    This class is a part of a grand review of the bedside neurological examination, focusing on aspects of the patient interview and mental status assessment.  The chiropractic physician must be able to differentiate disease of the neuro-musculoskeletal system and a competent examination is of key import.  The formal or “hands on” portion of the examination must always be preceded by a proper patient history and assessment of mental status. Join Dr. Ferezy in a rapid fire video lecture covering important aspects of patient history and assessment of mental status within the clinical bedside neurological examination.

    Class Objectives:

    Describe areas of concern in the history taking process.

    List areas of concern in the mental status examination.

    Identify and perform methods for eliciting a patient history.

    Identify and perform methods for examining the patient’s mental status.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    NOTE: THIS SAME CLASS (301) IS ALSO BUNDLED INTO THE 5 CEU "CHIROCLASSES ON-DEMAND 301-2-3" ALONG WITH CASES 302 & 303.

    Course Title: Cases in neurology: Numbness and weakness in a 50 year old male.

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Two (2) Classroom Hours

    Format: Audio/Video Slide Presentation

    Class Description:

    This class includes a complete discussion of a videotaped patient case.  The patient was brought by her treating chiropractor to the neurology diplomate program classroom in Des Moines Iowa in September of  2000.  He was a 5o year old male complaining of multiple areas of numbness, paresthesia and dysesthesia in his hands and feet, as well as across his abdomen and on his lateral lower extremity.  This class includes a review of the medical records prior to meeting the patient, the complete examination with discussion, and a report and discussion following the examination.

    Class Objectives:

    List the differential diagnoses that may accompany various symptoms. 

    Describe various essential elements of the history taking process.

    List differential diagnoses for this and similar cases.

    Itemize and describe several tests of lower extremity motor and reflex function.

    Recognize a true extensor toe sign from an equivocal or false finding.

    Contrast and compare aspects of various disorders causing cervical spine myelopathy.  

    Use proper language and nomenclature when producing a report for referring physicians.

    Recognize aspects of spinal cord disease.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board. 

    Neurological Examination Flow – A Brief Review

    Objectives - Neurology 214d

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: One (1) Classroom Hour

    Format: Video of live class

    Class Description:

    This class is designed to introduce the practicing doctor of chiropractic to a suggested neurological examination flow, as well as providing a pneumonic to remember parts of the neurological examination and a discussion of how lesions of different parts of the nervous system might be demonstrated on examination.

    Class Objectives:

    Correctly assess the “level of the lesion” in case scenario questions.

    Identify the components of the neurological examination.

    Demonstrate a basic examination flow from sitting to standing, to the supine and prone positions.

    Outline "Ferezy's MSR's" which is a pneumonic devise to help recall areas needing to be tested.

    Summarize implications of neurological findings for lesions in various parts of the central nervous system.

    Summarize implications of neurological findings for lesions in various parts of the peripheral nervous system.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    NOTE: THIS IS THE SAME AS CLASS 303 WHICH IS BUNDLED WITH 301 & 302 

    Neurology 314e1

    Course Title: Neurological Examination Review: History & Mental Status

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: One (1) Classroom Hour

    Format: 2 Part (1 &1b) Video of Live Class

    Class Description:

    This class is a part of a grand review of the bedside neurological examination, focusing on aspects of the patient interview and mental status assessment.  The chiropractic physician must be able to differentiate disease of the neuro-musculoskeletal system and a competent examination is of key import.  The formal or “hands on” portion of the examination must always be preceded by a proper patient history and assessment of mental status. Join Dr. Ferezy in a rapid fire video lecture covering important aspects of patient history and assessment of mental status within the clinical bedside neurological examination.

    Class Objectives:

    Describe areas of concern in the history taking process.

    List areas of concern in the mental status examination.

    Identify and perform methods for eliciting a patient history.

    Identify and perform methods for examining the patient’s mental status.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Neurology 314e2

    Course Title: Bedside Neurological Examination Review:

    Sub Title: Head, Neck, & Thyroid Examination, Evaluation of the Cranial Nerves with Review of Cervical Manipulation & VBI

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Five (5) CE Classroom Hours

    Format: 10 - 25 minute parts Video of live class 

    Class Description:

    This class is a part of a grand review of the bedside neurological examination, focusing The hands on evaluation of the neck (including the thyroid gland), head, cranial nerves, and also a review of the subject of vertebrobasilar accident following cervical manipulation.  The chiropractic physician must be able to differentiate disease of the neuro-musculoskeletal system and a competent examination is of key importance.  The formal or “hands on” portion of the examination should be performed by the physician who is best trained in that type of diagnosis.  The doctor of chiropractic is uniquely qualified to perpetuate the knowledge of the bedside physical examination and pass these skills to the next generation of doctors of chiropractic.  Join chiropractic neurologist Dr. Ferezy in a rapid fire video lecture covering important aspects of the evaluation of the clinical bedside neurological examination of the head, thyroid, neck, and cranial nerves, with an additional review of the issue of cervical manipulation and vertebrobasilar ischemia.

    Class Objectives:

    Identify the areas of proper placement of the stethoscope bell in order to auscultate various arteries and other vascular structures available in the head and neck.

    Perform palpation of the thyroid gland.

    Perform an examination of the cranial nerves.

    Evaluate the head and neck for signs of nervous system trauma.

    Draw out the visual pathways from retina to striate cortex of the occipital lobe.

    Associate patterns of visual field losses with various portions of optic pathway disease.

    List retinal areas to evaluate and associated parameters during the fundoscopic examination. 

    Correlate disorders of eye position and movement with peripheral cranial nerve disease, internuclear ophthalmoplegia and gaze palsy’s. 

    List current vertebrobasilar risk assessment options as well as the value and limitations of each.

    Outline the position of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges (ACC) in regard to vertebrobasilar ischemia (VBI) provocative testing in the chiropractic office.

    Identify suggested effects of elevated homocystine levels above 7.2 umol/L.

    Perform procedures recommended by the author to evaluate candidates for manipulative therapy.

    Summarize implications of neurological findings for lesions involving the cranial nerves or their central connections.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Neurology 314e3

    Course Title: Somatoform Disorders & Malingering

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: One (1) CE Classroom Hour

    Format: Video Slides 2 parts

    Class Description:

    This class will discuss a variety of non organic disorders known as Somatoform diseases.  Some of these disorders were previously termed “hysterical” disease.  Most of these disorders are categorized under the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) as mental illness classifications, and not in the International Classification of Disease (ICD) that is typically used by chiropractic physicians to categorize the disorder experienced by the patient.  Also, differentiation will be made between Somatoform disorders and frank malingering which is a distinctly separate entity, but shares many similarities upon physical examination.

    Class Objectives:

    Define the terms somatoform disorder, hysteria, malingering, organic and non organic disease.

    Contrast and compare organic and non organic disease.

    Contrast and compare somatoform disorder and malingering.

    Identify the most common symptoms described by patients suffering from Somatoform disorder, and develop a strategy to what degree the symptoms may have a somatoform component. 


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Neurology 314e4

    Course Title: The Cortex: Communication and Knowledge

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Two (2) CE Classroom Hours

    Format: Video Slides 4 parts, approximately 25 minutes each, 1 part 15 minutes 

    Class Description:

    Communication is necessary for civilization, as it is primarily how we interact with other animals.  The human cortex may be responsible for the role of communicating, including writing, gestures and the spoken word.  This lecture asks the question, what is language? Is it just the spoken word, or does it include things like body language and facial expression? The class explores how and where in the cortex is language processed.  It also reflects on what language can tell us about how our brains function, and, therefore, who we are.  Hemisphere dominance (“hemisphericity”) is discussed in detail.  The Schema of Monrad Crone is used to illustrate the “inputs and outputs” of human interaction. Many common terms associated with cortical disorders are defined including aphasia, agraphia and apraxia.  

    Class Objectives:

    Locate cortical areas responsible for language and describe the relationship between the areas and describe pathways of cortical information processing.

    Define the term “hemisphericity” in relation to hemisphere dominance and itemize various methods to determine hemisphere dominance for functions such as language, handedness, hearing, vision, etc.

    Describe results of “split brain” experiments regarding cortical processing of faces and items in regard to distribution of visual information and speech.

    Draw the relationships between the reception and expression categories in The Schema of Monrad Crone to illustrate the “inputs and outputs” of human interaction.

    Identify the cortical pathways involved from hearing and understanding to formulating speech and speaking, and discuss the relevance of pathway location to other cortical systems.

    Define common terms associated with cortical disorders including aphasia, agraphia and apraxia.   

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Neurology 314e5

    Course Title: A brief review of the neurological examination: Ferezy’s MSR’s

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    CE: Four (4) CE Classroom Hour (Parts 1-9)

    Class Description:

    This class is designed as a brief review of the most essential components of the neurological examination.  The class begins with a general discussion of the neurological examination and includes a mnemonic device to help recall the basic components of the neurological examination, and sub topics related to those components.  The discussion then includes aspects of the clinical examination of the motor systems, sensory systems, and reflex systems. 

    Class Objectives:

    List the major divisions and sub components of the neurological examination.

    Contrast and compare the effects of neurological lesions on the neurological examination of the central nervous system versus the peripheral nervous system.

    Recite the implications of neurological examination findings on disorders involving various components of the central and peripheral nervous system.

    Draw the anatomy of the lower motor neuron in its relation to the spinal cord, nerve root, spinal nerve, and the neuromyal junction.

    Describe components of the so called “SAID” principle of strength training and its relation to neural and muscular adaptation.

    List the five primary roles of functional skeletal muscle tissue.

    Describe and perform aspects of the neurological examination of the Motor Systems of the patient.

    Recite findings related to neurological “drift” performed during the neurological examination.

    Compare and contrast the findings of percussion myoedema with those of percussion myotonia.

    Discuss the significance of neural shock and detail expected associated neurological examination findings.

    Describe and perform aspects of the neurological examination of the Sensory Systems of the patient.

    List, contrast and compare the neurological signs associated with “release phenomenon” and “deficit phenomena”.

    Illustrate components of the muscle stretch reflex including the role of the Alpha motor neuron, Gama motor neuron, and large sensory fibers in relation to the muscle fibers and spinal cord.

    Describe and perform aspects of the neurological examination of the Reflex Systems of the patient.

    Draw the neurologic pathways associated with the eye light reflexes.  Include reference to cells of the retina, the optic nerve, the optic chiasm, the optic tract, the Pretectal nucleus, and the Edinger Westphal nucleus.

    Itemize and discuss categories of neurological involuntary movements.

    Perform and discuss three versions of the extensor plantar response (extensor toe sign, Babinski sign).

    Discuss the common shorthand used for grading muscle stretch reflex responses and discuss the results of the neurological examination associated with each grade.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register
    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    Course Title: Non-Organic Physical Signs: Are tests for “Fakers” credible? + Fundamentals and mechanics of the neurological examination

    Course Instructor: Joseph S. Ferezy, DC

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    CEU: One (1) CE Classroom Hour

    Class Description:

    People often present to health care providers following motor vehicle collisions and work incidents.  The party responsible for payment of related health care costs, both in the short and long term, often becomes a legal issue.  A part of the decision regarding payment is often based upon the expert opinion of a so called “Independent” (often referred to as “Adverse”) examiner of the patient.  The examination typically incorporates standard orthopedic tests with other tests for “Non-organic physical signs”.  These tests claim to be able to distinguish between organic or “real” damage from the alleged injury, from non-organic or “fake” damage, which may be due issues unrelated to the injury, from overt lying for a financial settlement (which is a crime), or from mental issues such as depression. This brief talk will discus the concept of organic vs. non organic disease.  “Waddell’s Sign’s” 8 signs, as well as another 6 tests for non organic physical signs will be described and critically examined. This brief class will review the fundamental mechanics of the neurological/ physical examination.  A format for examining the patient while the patient is standing, sitting, supine, and prone, will be presented. 

    Class Objectives:

    Contrast and compare the physical neurological examination with the physical examination of other body systems.

    Perform a neurological examination in a logical, physical sequence from sitting to standing, supine and prone.

    Describe and perform “Waddell’s Tests and six other special tests described in the literature to detect complaints without a physical basis.

    Itemize pitfalls and critically review special tests described in the literature to detect complaints without a physical basis.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ChiroClasses 105 Record Keeping Teleseminar.

    “If you did not chart it, it was not done”.  Time and time again we hear this, but are your patient’s health chart that complete?  The medical record is second in importance only to the actual care of the patient.  It is designed to remind you of the salient points of your patient’s case, but also to be used and often relied upon by other physicians who may be otherwise unfamiliar with your patient.  Further the health record is used by third parties such as insurers to determine benefit qualifications, the legal system for things such as injury and disability claims, and by the government in eligibility for various state & federal programs such as medical assistance and social security disability.  Your health record may also be used in civil and criminal cases as it constitutes a legal record of the patient’s health and whereabouts at a period in time.  Your notes may be used as official documents in cases of malpractice, disability, boundary violation, and other legal disputes.  This class will explain what should be documented in every patient encounter, and why.  It will also review various forms of electronic medical records and discuss strengths and weaknesses of each form.   

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Class Objectives:

    List the various governing bodies and organizations which may impose requirements on your record keeping of the patient’s health chart.

    Describe various types of patient encounters and levels of documentation, and determine how to properly document each encounter.

    Identify key components of the office entry forms and relate the importance of follow up and systems review.

    Comprehend and explain ethical dilemmas which may arise in practice and identify ethical strategies to deal with them.

    Compare and contrast various outcome assessment instruments, describe the importance of these tools and properly use and score various outcome assessment instruments.

    Recite tests traditionally thought of as objective and tests traditionally thought of as subjective in the context of reliability and validity.

    Define the characteristics of a good outcome assessment tool, and be able to properly implement it in clinical practice.

    List the minimal record keeping requirements in the state or province in which you practice.

    Compare and contrast the various types of electronic health records available.

    Itemize the requirements of a “paperless” office.


    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • ON-DEMAND
    Register

    Title: Interesting Cases in Family Practice

    Speaker: Dawn Schissel, MD

    Live Symposium Video with Slides – 1 CEU

    Join Dawn Schissel, MD as she discusses 6 cases that walked into her family practice office.  Keep in mind, these are the same patients that could walk into your office tomorrow!

    This class is a video of a live class in April 2018, and includes the instructor and slides on the same screen.

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Objectives:

    List common signs and symptoms of Perinephric Abscess.

    List common signs and symptoms of Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus.

    List common signs and symptoms of Methanphetimine use and Complications.

    List common signs and symptoms of Cavernous Hemangioma.

    List common signs and symptoms of Cardiomyopathy.

    Discuss use of Zoll Lifevest.

    List common signs and symptoms of Quinolone toxicity.

    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • ON-DEMAND
    Register

    Title: Orthopedic Surgery (Extremities) & Joint Replacement

    Speaker: Todd Peterson, DO

    Live Symposium Video with Slides – 2 CEU

    Join Todd Peterson, DO as he discusses various common conditions of the upper and lower extremities where the Doctor of Chiropractic may consider surgical referral. 

    This class is a video of a live class in April 2018, and includes the instructor and slides on the same screen.

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Objectives:

    Compare and contrast use of PRP injections for joints versus tendons.

    Itemize criticisms of Stem Cell injections and discuss the current state of the science.

    Contrast characterized and uncharacterized Stem Cell therapies.

    List the relative indications for hip replacement.

    List common hip injuries that may require surgical referral, and discuss the surgical procedure most likely to be employed.

    List Indications for knee replacement.

    Describe progression from normal knee to a knee with severe osteoarthritis.

    Compare and contrast the indications and procedures for a partial knee replacement and a total knee replacement.

    List the benefits of robotic joint replacement surgery.

    List the rational for surgical referral for surgical treatment and possible joint replacement.

    List common knee injuries that may require surgical referral, and discuss the surgical procedure most likely to be employed.

    Compare and contrast shoulder replacement and reverse shoulder replacement, emphasizing the relative indications for each.

     List common shoulder injuries that may require surgical referral, and discuss the surgical procedure most likely to be employed.

    List common elbow injuries that may require surgical referral, and discuss the surgical procedure most likely to be employed.

    List common hand and wrist injuries that may require surgical referral, and discuss the surgical procedure most likely to be employed.



    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • ON-DEMAND
    Register

    Title: Neurodegeneration: Mechanisms, pathways and therapeutic actions.

    Speaker: Jon Lozier, DC

    Live Class (June 2018) Video with Slides – 2 CEU

    Neurodegeneration use the slow and long-term Loss of neurons as a result of oxidative damage.  Many of the mechanisms behind diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer's disease, and even multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis are becoming more clearly understood.  Further, there is good and scientific literature suggesting that these poses sees can be slowed down or even reversed in some cases by way of nutritional support.  This lecture lays out the case for Neurodegeneration due to oxidative damage, discusses biochemical pathways that may be involved, and suggests nutritional therapeutics.

    Objectives:

    Define Neurodegeneration.

    Identify some of the core mechanisms of Neurodegeneration.

    Define and discuss oxidative stress and damage of neurons.

    List most common neurological illnesses thought to be due to long-term Neurodegeneration.

    Cite specific biochemical pathways to target therapeutically to slow down or reverse Neurodegeneration.

    Itemize common clinical findings in Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis.

    List the mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process.

    Define free radicals, articulate the issue with free radicals and describe their role in the neurodegenerative process.

    Discuss the role of glial cells in regard to Neurodegeneration.

    Itemize ways to increase the Nrf2 pathway.

    Discuss glutathione and list specific methods to increase glutathione levels.

    List dangers found in regard to genetically modified foods.

    Compare and contrast normal mitochondrial structure and function with dysfunctional mitochondria with attention to free radical damage to my no conjugal proteins and mitochondrial DNA.

    Discuss the therapeutic role of essential fatty acids (EFA's), Acetyl-L-Carnitine, and coenzyme Q-10.

    List and discuss methods for laboratory evaluation of systemic inflammation.

    Itemize issues associated with the "leaky gut" syndrome, including aspects of inflammation, relation to diabetes, and Zonulin.



    • 01 Jan 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • TELESEMINAR
    Register

    ON-DEMAND: Sign up and take the class at anytime.  Take the test at any time and receive your certificate via email upon successful completion. CEU valid for CO, IA, & NE. Other states may apply, check with your applicable state board.

    *After you register watch for your confirmation email with all the links to begin*

    Course Title: Neurology 207a

    Subtitle: Introduction to Electrodiagnostic Medicine

    Course Instructor: J. Donald Dishman, DC

    CE: Four (4) Classroom Hours (8 Video Parts)

    Format: Video (TeleSeminar) 2015

    Course Description:

    In order to understand definitive diagnosis in neurological disease one must understand how to use adjunctive laboratory tests.   The plain film x-ray, for example, is a test embraced by most doctors of chiropractic, who tend to be very skilled in plain film radiology interpretation.   Electrodiagnosis, on the other hand, represents a series of tests that the average doctor of chiropractic is not well acquainted with, yet gives us a physiologic picture of nerve and muscle activity.  Electrodiagnosis has stood the test of time and is a valid tool with utility in a wide variety of neuromuscular conditions commonly seen by doctors of chiropractic. 

    Join Dr. J. Donald Dishman for a serious discussion of this specialty, starting with the most basic information and definitions regarding electrodiagnosis, and gradually adding detail, with the emphasis on what a chiropractor needs to know in order to properly use electrodiagnosis as an adjunct to the neurological examination. This class does not train the student to perform an electrodiagnostic examination, but is instead is a guide to understanding the variety of tests available as well as what those tests look like and what those tests can and can not do. 

    Class Objectives:

    List several textbooks on electrodiagnostic medicine and discuss the benefits and limitations of each text.

    Recite several applications of electrodiagnostic medicine and discuss the utility of each of the tests performed.

    Describe the components required to perform an electrodiagnostic examination.

    Compare and contrast peripheral nerve injury classifications.

    Define some of the current terminology used in electrodiagnostic medicine.

    Compare and contrast the different types of electrodes used in electrodiagnostic medicine.

    Describe terminal motor latencies.

    Describe sensory and motor conduction velocities and studies.

    Describe electromyography.

    Discuss orthodromic and anti-dromic testing.

    Define motor unit potentials and discuss the normal and abnormal phases.

    Describe the varieties of evoked potentials and discuss the clinical utility of ordering each test.

    Describe the varieties of late potentials and discuss the clinical utility of ordering these tests.

    Identify the relevant neuroanatomy of the peripheral nervous system.

    Demonstrate median and ulnar nerves and the position of the various electrodes in common motor and sensory electrodiagnostic studies of the median and ulnar nerves.

    Discuss the conditions and circumstances when electrodiagnostic testing of the central nervous system may be beneficial or necessary.

    Describe the various electrodiagnostic procedures for the peripheral nervous system.

    Differentiate between motor unit potentials (MUP’s), fibrillations, positive sharp waves and sensory nerve action potentials (SNAP’s). 

    Contrast and compare electrodiagnostic tests for extremity complaints such as weakness and sensory loss.

    Define the role of electrodiagnosis in clinical practice.

    • 02 Aug 2018
    • 31 Dec 2018
    • ON-DEMAND
    Register

    Title: Documentation Of Chiropractic Subluxation: The Medicare Standard.

    Speaker: Joseph S. Ferezy, D.C.

    Live Class (June 2018) Video with Slides – 2 CEU

    This was a live class for chiropractic doctor’s which was recorded as a part of their continuing education. The class explores the subluxation from the point of view of how to properly document that a subluxation exists and other factors essential for compliance with Federal Medicare Guidelines.  Personal response devices ("clickers") were used by the approximately 60 class participants to add an interactive aspect to the program. Personal opinions of the speaker are inserted to put a provider’s perspective on the Medicare requirements. 

    Objectives:

    Explain how and why documentation of a subluxation is so important for Medicare patients in chiropractic practice.

    Compare and contrast the Medicare reimbursement of chiropractic providers vs. Medical and other providers for similar services.

    Describe payments made to chiropractors, calculate the actual dollars per visit and explain what portion of payments made are considered inappropriate as medically unnecessary according to a report issued by the Department Of Health And Human Services (HHS).

    Compare and contrast non-provider services, such as drugs and durable medical devices with costs associated with chiropractic care.

    Define requirements for chiropractic services to be covered by Medicare.

    List and discuss how a subluxation may be properly documented in the medical record for Medicare patients.

    Evaluate your understanding of subluxation compared to other chiropractic providers. 

    List the various types of subluxation which may be demonstrated on xray and are acceptable to Medicare.

    List the components of the physical examination which are required by Medicare to be demonstrated in order to verify the existence of a subluxation.

    Identify the specific requirements accepted by Medicare for the initial and subsequent visits of the chiropractic patient.



    • 16 Nov 2019
    • 7:30 AM
    • 17 Nov 2019
    • 3:30 PM
    • Events Center at HILTON GARDEN INN - 205 South 64th Street, West Des Moines, Iowa 50266 - 515-223-0571
    • 300
    Register

    LICENSE RENEWAL SERIES 20 CEU

    IA Location (CE valid in CO, IA, & NE*) 

    November 16 & 17, 2019

    For over 20 years Dr. Joseph S. Ferezy has prepared a special class meeting the needs of chiropractors in order to maintain their Chiropractic License. This class features general chiropractic continuing education topics, in addition to including State of Iowa Approved Abuse Recognition Training, Iowa Code for Chiropractors, Ethics and Professional Boundaries.   

    This blend of chiropractic, and its integration with medicine & surgery, has become a favorite class for hundreds of chiropractors for over 20 years. 

    TUITION INCLUDES: 

    Luncheon Saturday & Sunday

    Luxury Facility & Generous Catered Breaks

    FIVE SPEAKERS:
    Joseph S. Ferezy, DC
    Marc E. Hines, MD (Pending)
    Todd C. Peterson, DO
    Dawn M. Schissel, MD
    Greg J. Yanish, MD

    MULTIPLE CONCISE TOPICS 
    20 CE HOURS AVAILABLE - SOME IA REQUIRED*
    LUNCHEON INCLUDED
    CATERED BREAKS
    VENUE AT HILTON GARDEN INN
    "FACE TO FACE" CLINICAL CASE MANAGEMENT

    2 CE HOURS ETHICS & PROFESSIONAL BOUNDARIES

    1 CE IOWA CODE
    2 CE ABUSE RECOGNITION
    (State of IA Child & Dependant Adult Abuse Recognition Approval #2264)


    CLICK HERE! - LIMITED ROOMS AVAILABLE - ONLY $109

    Click for Class Schedule

    Click for Downloadable Registration

    Click for Hotel Website

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Class Syllabus*

    *Times, Topics & Speakers are Subject To Change

    Saturday, October 20, 2018 - 7:30 a.m.  

    Registration/meet exhibitors - 12 LIVE CE

    08:00 am   TBD (3 CEU)

    10:30 am BREAK

    10:45 am  TBD (2 CEU)

    12:25 pm   LUNCHEON.

    01:00 pm  TBD (1 CEU)

    01:50 pm Dr. Peterson - Orthopedic Surgery (2 CEU)

    03:30 pm  BREAK

    03:45 pm  TBD (2 CEU)

    05:25 pm  TBD (2 CEU)

    07:05 pm Class Concludes.

    Class Syllabus*

    Sunday, October 21, 2018 - 7:45 a.m. 

    Registration/Meet Exhibitors. – 8 LIVE CE

    08:00 a.m.  TBD. (1 CEU)

    08:50 a.m.  Dr. Schissel - Cases in Family Medicine. (1 CEU)

    09:40 a.mTBD. (1 CEU)

    10:30 a.m. BREAK

    10:45 a.m.  JS FerezyDCProfessional Boundaries & Ethics, an interactive discussion. (2 CE)

    12:25 p.m.  LUNCHEON.

    01:00 p.m.  JS Ferezy, DC: Iowa code. (1 CE)

    01:50 p.m. Abuse Recognition: Child and Adult Dependent. (2 CE)

    3:50 p.m.  Course Concludes. 

    *Class is designed to comply with CO, IA, NE state requirements for chiropractic continuing education.  16 CEU maximum in NE.  Other restrictions may apply. Please consult with your state board if you have any questions about your particular situation.

NOTE: If you have a credit from a previous class, or are taking advantage of a FREE Online class offered with a live program, please register online for the class of your choice, but do not pay for the class.  ChiroClasses will contact you, verify your seat, and apply any credit due. Or, just call us at 515-957-6056 and we will take your registration over the telephone.

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